YOUTH CODE : Mosh EBM

Youth Code est un duo élec­tron­ique formé en 2012 dans les flammes du chaos à L.A. Ryan George et Sara Tay­lor for­ment un cou­ple sur scène comme à la vie et sont le pre­mier groupe à avoir sorti un disque sur l’obscur label de Psy­chic TV, Angry Love Pro­duc­tions. Leur pre­mier album, sobre et bru­tal, est sorti en sep­tem­bre dernier sur Dais Records. Depuis, ils n’arrêtent pas de jouer et vien­nent de ren­trer d’une tournée améri­caine de 20 dates. EBM, Mosh, 2014 : voici leur interview.

La ver­sion en français est sur NOISEY.

Who is Youth Code ? Tell me how it started.
S:
youth code is Sara Tay­lor and Ryan George. Two peo­ple in love who make indus­trial music. We started this band on a whim because there was an artist show­case for all employ­ees of where I work ( vaca­tion vinyl in sil­ver­lake, ca) I wasn’t con­tribut­ing so I said we had a band. We haven’t stopped since then.
R:
I’ve been writ­ing elec­tronic music for years but never really did any­thing with it. Sara thought we should do a band together and booked a show. I was almost forced to come up with what became Youth Code. I’m glad she pushed me to do it. It’s some­thing that allows us to travel together and gives us a hobby to share. Also, YC always keeps me inter­ested because of the tech­nol­ogy. It’s excit­ing and gives a lot of room for exper­i­men­ta­tion. I’ve been around gui­tars and drums my whole life. With syn­the­siz­ers, I find new sounds every time I sit down with them. It keeps me inspired. YC is just the band that we wanted to hear and what we felt was miss­ing from the under­ground music world.

I dis­cov­ered your band on Noisey. Some crony­ism involved ? Haha.
S:
No?
R:
No. Do you think we don’t deserve atten­tion? We are for­tu­nate enough to be on one of the best labels cur­rently in exis­tence (DAIS RECORDS) and have cov­ered a lot of ground in the short time we’ve been a band. We played sev­eral shows in LA, SF and flew out to play NYC in the first cou­ple months of us start­ing. All off of a demo tape. Put out a 7″ on Angry Love Pro­duc­tions and then toured the U.S. when our LP came out. We make it a point to play shows with all kinds of bands far beyond our com­fort level. Believe it or not, hard work pays off. 

Ryan, you used to play in hard­core band Carry On. I had a the­ory about the fact a lot of ancient hard­core dudes are now doing «indus­trial» music…
S:
I don’t think 90’s– early 00’s hard­core is “ancient” by any means. Who else does indus­trial?  the first Ray + Por­cell tape with a drum machine?
R:
I don’t know any­one from hard­core that does indus­trial music. I think Jesse from Hoax is try­ing to start some­thing… but I guess you know some­thing I don’t. I know a few peo­ple that are doing synth pop/indy rock stuff that came from HC. But not ebm or Industrial.

Your album is one of the most bru­tal elec­tronic stuff I heard this year. It’s not easy to make EBM sound good today with­out falling into gothic abyss or cyber shitty elec­tron­ics. Any recipe tip ?
S:
I think it’s just look­ing towards what influ­ences us. We like punk and hard­core, and also we like early wax trax era indus­trial — when it was bru­tal.… so nat­u­rally lik­ing that stuff helped us shape our sound.
R:
We couldn’t do any­thing other than what we do. I know Sara has a lit­tle soft spot for some of the more cyber club type music but when we get together to write, we just try to write as rough as we can with the lim­ited gear we have. I think most ebm type bands are lazy and rely on com­put­ers too much, which sadly, can suck the life out of what could’ve pos­si­bly been a great song. Of course, there are a few excep­tions but it’s baf­fling to me why they wouldn’t just get an mpc and a cou­ple key­boards instead. It sounds so much bet­ter and the lim­i­ta­tions of hard­ware force you to think out­side the box.
We also lis­ten to a lot of power elec­tron­ics and tho we aren’t a PE band, I think that raw­ness tends to seep through a lit­tle. The bet­ter we get at play­ing together, it’s just going to get more aggres­sive and structured.

Who’s still lis­ten­ing to Skinny Puppy & Front Line assem­bly today ?
S:
I think a lot of peo­ple lis­ten to FLA and skinny puppy. They both just released new records that did pretty well, and SP is going on a mas­sive US tour.
R:
Hon­estly, it’s mostly older peo­ple that are still lis­ten­ing to FLA and Puppy type bands. We hope that we can get younger peo­ple into some of the older bands through what we do. I think the genre has been greatly over­looked and has a lot of poten­tial left to explore.

What kind of audi­ence do you have in the U.S. ?
S:
We have a var­ied audi­ence of kids from Cyber Goth Rivet Heads to Hard­core Kids. I think since we don’t just fit into one place nei­ther do our fans.
R:
Like Sara said, our audi­ence is very diverse.

Do you lis­ten to non-aggressive music ?
S:
I lis­ten to all sorts of music. I really love danc­ing around the house to Robyn. It would be dumb to be all tuff all the time. Life is about vari­ety.
R:
Of course. We lis­ten to so much dif­fer­ent music.

What are you deal­ing with in your lyrics ?
S:
Issues of change, frus­tra­tion… nor­mal every­day life stuff.
R:
The human con­di­tion. Love and loss.

Am I wrong if I say there’s a runic inspi­ra­tion in your design ?
S:
It’s not really runic at all. I was inspired by the way Chris Conn draws dag­gers, so I changed the han­dle of the dag­ger to a Y and then put a C under­neath it.
R:
Sara does all the art­work. We’re not inter­ested in using runes in our art.

What are you inter­ested in, what are your main con­cerns ?
S:
My main con­cerns are hav­ing a happy and ful­filled life. The issues of the world are always things to read up on, but I mainly focus on what’s going on in our home. Is our dog ok, how can we fur­ther our cre­ativ­ity, what’s next on our agenda. These are the things that con­cern me every­day.
R:
On the rare occa­sion that I write lyrics, pol­i­tics are there. But I break them down to some­thing smaller and slightly hid­den. The well being of my loved ones are my main con­cern and try­ing to be the best human I can be.Think glob­ally and act locally, or how­ever the say­ing goes.

Is life in L.A. bor­ing ?
S: Life in LA is any­thing but bor­ing. I lived in Lon­don for a while, It was awe­some — but I don’t like being too far away from my fam­ily ( who are all in LA).
R:
Los Ange­les is the best city on the planet. What most peo­ple think of LA is a very small pop­u­la­tion of the city that the media tends to focus on. I’m con­stantly inspired by the peo­ple in our community.

Any­thing to add ?
S:
Nope! Thanks for this inter­view oppor­tu­nity though!
R:
Thank you.

LACHER UN COM

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